June302014
gjmueller:

When educational games work: Mission U.S. demonstrates best of video game learning

More than 90 percent of children in the U.S. between the ages of two and 17 play video games. While the majority of video game research has focused on the potential harmful effects of video games, including children becoming less sensitive to the pain and suffering of others and becoming more fearful of the world, recent research suggests there are also benefits, and the right game can engage students in learning more effectively than traditional classroom activities.
The right video games can lead to higher performance and achievement levels in both school and work, according to the “The Benefits of Playing Video Games” report released earlier this year and published in the American Psychological Association journal, “American Psychologist.”

gjmueller:

When educational games work: Mission U.S. demonstrates best of video game learning

More than 90 percent of children in the U.S. between the ages of two and 17 play video games. While the majority of video game research has focused on the potential harmful effects of video games, including children becoming less sensitive to the pain and suffering of others and becoming more fearful of the world, recent research suggests there are also benefits, and the right game can engage students in learning more effectively than traditional classroom activities.

The right video games can lead to higher performance and achievement levels in both school and work, according to the “The Benefits of Playing Video Games” report released earlier this year and published in the American Psychological Association journal, “American Psychologist.”

6PM
June72014
cinephiliabeyond:

Orson Welles talks to Huw Wheldon on the BBC show ‘Monitor’ (1960) about his work as actor, director and filmmaker, with clips from his films, ‘Citizen Kane’ and ‘The Magnificent Ambersons.’

Also, recommended viewing: Huw Wheldon interviews Orson Welles, Peter O’Toole and Ernest Milton in this epic discussion of ‘Hamlet’ on the same BBC show from 1963. At the time this programme was made, Peter O’Toole was enjoying his first taste of stardom, having been nominated for an Oscar for his leading role in David Lean’s masterpiece, ‘Lawrence of Arabia.’ During the same year (1963), he would also star as ‘Hamlet’ in the National Theatre’s inaugural performance, directed by Laurence Olivier. O’Toole’s stage credentials were impeccable, as he had been recruited to the Royal Shakespeare Company by Peter Hall at the tender age of 26.

Required viewing: a vintage interview captures the artist reflecting on ‘Citizen Kane’ and expounding on directing, acting and writing and his desire to bestow a valuable legacy upon his profession. The scene is a hotel room in Paris. The year 1960. The star, Orson Welles. This is a pearl of cinematic memorabilia.


For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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cinephiliabeyond:

Orson Welles talks to Huw Wheldon on the BBC show ‘Monitor’ (1960) about his work as actor, director and filmmaker, with clips from his films, ‘Citizen Kane’ and ‘The Magnificent Ambersons.’

Also, recommended viewing: Huw Wheldon interviews Orson Welles, Peter O’Toole and Ernest Milton in this epic discussion of ‘Hamlet’ on the same BBC show from 1963. At the time this programme was made, Peter O’Toole was enjoying his first taste of stardom, having been nominated for an Oscar for his leading role in David Lean’s masterpiece, ‘Lawrence of Arabia.’ During the same year (1963), he would also star as ‘Hamlet’ in the National Theatre’s inaugural performance, directed by Laurence Olivier. O’Toole’s stage credentials were impeccable, as he had been recruited to the Royal Shakespeare Company by Peter Hall at the tender age of 26.

Required viewing: a vintage interview captures the artist reflecting on ‘Citizen Kane’ and expounding on directing, acting and writing and his desire to bestow a valuable legacy upon his profession. The scene is a hotel room in Paris. The year 1960. The star, Orson Welles. This is a pearl of cinematic memorabilia.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

June62014

Txch This Week: Impossible Planets And Sci-Fi Floating Cities

txchnologist:

image

by Norman Rozenberg

This week on Txchnologist, we got up close and personal with some of the tiniest innovations making huge splashes in the world of science. First, Julia Greer and her Caltech research team has made leaps in the world of nanoscale materials. Using direct laser writing, the team is creating complex microscopic architecture that can be tuned to specific needs by engineers.

Scientists in the Netherlands have designed flat shapes that fold into all kinds of tiny 3-D structures with a drop of water. In addition to cool party tricks, these sand granule-sized pieces of silicon have potentially important uses in medicine.

Genetic engineers looking for better ways to make biofuels have designed bacteria to convert complex carbohydrates found in non food plants directly into ethanol. With rising oil prices across the globe and increasing carbon emissions, a new source of fuel is not only important but necessary. This development may have just steered us into the fast lane.

It’s no secret that advances are moving fast throughout medicine. Now, a Swiss team has taken things a step further and designed medical implants that could potentially last a lifetime using diamond-like carbon coatings and the rare, nonreactive metal tantalum. Meanwhile, Indian Institute of Science engineers are using wasp physiology to design new surgical tools. A species of wasp may be the next muse for less invasive tools that will help recovery times and outcomes.

Now we’re bringing you the news we’ve been following this week in the world of science, technology and innovation.

Read More

6PM
4PM
3PM
thisistheverge:

This is the fastest photo chat app in the world
Taptalk is, dare I say, cooler than Snapchat. Its interface is more confusing, its user base is smaller, and — it lets you send a photo even faster than today’s hottest photo chat app. That last part is important: Snapchat made sending photos so fast that with a fraction of its user base, the app saw more photos shared per day than Facebook, and Taptalk is bound to take photo-sharing a step further.

thisistheverge:

This is the fastest photo chat app in the world
Taptalk is, dare I say, cooler than Snapchat. Its interface is more confusing, its user base is smaller, and — it lets you send a photo even faster than today’s hottest photo chat app. That last part is important: Snapchat made sending photos so fast that with a fraction of its user base, the app saw more photos shared per day than Facebook, and Taptalk is bound to take photo-sharing a step further.

1PM
June52014
1PM
cinephiliabeyond:

One of our favorite behind-the-scenes photos: Federico Fellini directs ‘8½,’ 1962. “Say the magic words, then when the picture moves its eyes, we’ll all be rich.”
As Roger Ebert said so well, “‘8½’ is the best film ever made about filmmaking. It is told from the director’s point of view, and its hero, Guido (Marcello Mastroianni), is clearly intended to represent Fellini. I have seen ‘8½’ over and over again, and my appreciation only deepens. It does what is almost impossible: Fellini is a magician who discusses, reveals, explains and deconstructs his tricks, while still fooling us with them. He claims he doesn’t know what he wants or how to achieve it, and the film proves he knows exactly, and rejoices in his knowledge.”

Here’s a special treat: Federico Fellini, Ennio Flaiano, Tullio Pinelli, and Brunello Rondi’s continuity screenplay for ‘8½’ [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only).

Fellini attached a note to himself below the camera’s eyepiece which read, “Remember, this is a comedy.” A joy to watch: 8 minutes on the set of Fellini’s ‘8½.’

Reads/Watches/Listens:
Federico Fellini: director as protagonist
‘8½’: the steambath sequence
‘8½’: the Saraghina sequence
‘8½’: on the set
‘8½’: press kit
‘8½’: handout
Fellini: A Director’s Notebook (1969)
‘8½’ — The Criterion Collection
A telegram received in 1968 by Stanley Kubrick shortly after the release of his cinematic tour de force, ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’; sent to him by fellow filmmaker, Federico Fellini

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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cinephiliabeyond:

One of our favorite behind-the-scenes photos: Federico Fellini directs ‘8½,’ 1962. “Say the magic words, then when the picture moves its eyes, we’ll all be rich.”

As Roger Ebert said so well, “‘8½’ is the best film ever made about filmmaking. It is told from the director’s point of view, and its hero, Guido (Marcello Mastroianni), is clearly intended to represent Fellini. I have seen ‘8½’ over and over again, and my appreciation only deepens. It does what is almost impossible: Fellini is a magician who discusses, reveals, explains and deconstructs his tricks, while still fooling us with them. He claims he doesn’t know what he wants or how to achieve it, and the film proves he knows exactly, and rejoices in his knowledge.”

Here’s a special treat: Federico Fellini, Ennio Flaiano, Tullio Pinelli, and Brunello Rondi’s continuity screenplay for ‘8½’ [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only).

Fellini attached a note to himself below the camera’s eyepiece which read, “Remember, this is a comedy.” A joy to watch: 8 minutes on the set of Fellini’s ‘8½.’

Reads/Watches/Listens:

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

11AM
June42014
emergentfutures:

The Trick That Makes Google’s Self-Driving Cars Work



Google is engaging in unprecedented, massive, ongoing data collection to transform intractable problems into solvable chores.


Full Story: Atlantic

emergentfutures:

The Trick That Makes Google’s Self-Driving Cars Work

Google is engaging in unprecedented, massive, ongoing data collection to transform intractable problems into solvable chores.
Full Story: Atlantic
6PM

prostheticknowledge:

The Silva Field Guide To Birds Of A Parallel Future

Net artist Rick Silva's work combines nature and virtual 3D abstraction. His latest project features several examples of bird flight in abstracted geometric form.

Some examples embedded below:

The whole collection of works in this series can be found here

11AM
April112014
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